French Past Participle Agreement Direct Object

It usually answers the question ”What?” or ”Who?” What do I eat? The cookie. A direct object name replaces the direct object if the direct object is already implied. Instead of ”I eat the cookie,” you could just say, ”I`ll eat it.” In fact, this is good news when it comes to the language spoken. In everyday French, past participations rarely change their pronunciation. At the GCSE level, the most important past participation that must be remembered, which changes its pronunciation, is indeed the reflexive verb to sit (sit) that will sit > seat. The last `s` is not pronounced in the masculine form, but is pronounced (like z-Laut) in the feminine. A number of common verbs have irregular past scores whose forms are worth remembering: if there is a direct object that is the recipient of the plot, then the rules of conformity are the same as for having: the past participation corresponds to the direct object when placed in front of the verb, and does not match, if placed afterwards.. . . .